Make sure your intranet strategy is still going when everyone else has stopped

Everything is on hold at the moment…

Intranets and the accompany strategy which steers their direction have an uncanny knack of grinding to a halt. Sometimes this is down to their perilous state as a result from under-investment. If this is the case, we recommend special emergency measures be put in place to implement a “Minimum Viable Repair” and get it (and you) moving again.

However, intranet strategy also regularly “stops” in other organisations, including (in our experience) some of the most well-resourced and well-known global companies. Ask what the intranet strategy is and the answer is sometimes “we’re planning to update that” or “it’s on hold at the moment” or there is some sheepish mumbling while the intranet team gaze at their shoes.

Er, where’s the strategy?

In many cases the closest thing to an intranet strategy that exists is a document which was produced during the project for the last iteration or update, and which envisaged a shiny new post-launch world of continuous improvement. If you are really unlucky this is in the form of a slide deck. Sometimes there might be something more “current” which exists a woolly paragraph or passing reference to the intranet in the latest internal comms, IT or digital strategy.

There are several reasons why intranet strategy pauses including a new platform on the horizon or an organisational change, and I’ll be exploring these in more detail below. Despite these often highly plausible reasons for a stop in intranet strategy, intranets don’t stop, and the organisations which they mirror don’t stop either. Your customers and your competitors also won’t be stopping!

Intranets are a 24/7 environment which is critical to the way employees operate. Arguably they contribute to the bottom line and provide competitive advantage. They are a channel to help senior management deliver organisational strategy. So, in our view, intranet strategy and the accompany roadmap are very important, and should not be an area of neglect. Halting them misses a trick, and is the basis for under-delivering to users and stakeholders. It is basically saying it is OK to put your intranet on hold, and that is another way of undervaluing your intranet,

Having an up to date strategy and roadmap:

  • Gives the intranet team direction and a basis to plan and prioritise your activity

  • Means you are more likely to be aligned to organisational strategy and needs

  • Is the basis for continuous improvement, even if the changes are small and incremental

  • Sends out the right messages to stakeholders and users

  • Is really important in engaging site manager / super-user / publishing communities

  • You never know when you’re going to need one at the ready at short-notice

  • Leads to more job satisfaction when you deliver the goods against it

Reasons why intranet strategy pauses

There are several reasons why strategy stops. Usually it’s a combination of one or more of these: Sometimes these are good reasons, sometimes these are excuses for not having a strategy. Ultimately, you decide which.

Busy busy busy

Firstly intranet teams are busy. Very busy. They are swamped by the overwhelming operational inbox that often comes with the territory. Good intentions inevitably get trampled on by workload.

But trust on this one, getting the strategy and roadmap right is worth prioritising especially if there is a link between the direction you need to go in and the reason you are impossibly busy.

The stakeholders are seemingly unengaged

OK, ideally an intranet strategy should be reviewed, critiqued and signed-off by stakeholders who have a whiff of seniority about them, and quite possibly represent IT, Comms and HR. We know in many places that is not going to happen because the stakeholders don’t care, or more likely are too busy to give it proper attention.

If this is the case and there isn’t much you can do about it, assume that the stakeholders trust you. They know the intranet is in good hands. Assume that if the intranet was failing they absolutely would take an interest. If they trust you with the intranet, they also trust you with intranet strategy. It’s up to you to define this. Even if the output gets waved under their nose, and they nod, take that as approval. Seeing something coherent and well-argued, may actually surprise them, and could lead to a budgeting decision. Someone has to do intranet strategy, and it looks like it is you.

There’s a new Director of Comms / IT / KM / HR on the way

So there’s a new owner of the intranet on the way.  The intranet strategy was going to go through its annual review but we might as well wait for the new Director to come in to wait for their input.

Personally I think waiting is a mistake. It can take ages for a new senior stakeholder to get to know the business, and for the intranet to be properly on their radar. Let’s say it could take six months. Given that senior replacement appointments might be known about six months in advance, then it could be up to 12 months before intranet strategy comes up as a topic for discussion.

Having an up to date intranet strategy already in place sends out all the right messages to someone who is probably your new boss. It also ensures continuity and means that you are more likely to have your dabs all over the strategy.

In larger organisations there may be a steering committee which ratifies the strategy and they might want to halt any updates to it based on the new owner, but if you can influence them, carry on as business-as-usual.

There’s a new new intranet platform or SharePoint on the horizon

The biggest mistake intranet teams make is putting everything on hold while IT makes up its mind about a new platform. We may be going to SharePoint? How long before a) IT make up their mind b) The agreements are signed c) The project is implemented d) The legacy systems are phased out. We’re talking potentially years! So until you’ve seen that bit of paper signed, assume it isn’t happening and everything is business-as-usual.

Moreover strategy should be largely agnostic of technology. And although inevitably your direction probably does need to reference an impending decision by IT e.g. perhaps heavy customisation isn’t such a good idea, many of the improvements you influence are around information architecture, findability and content management.

Many improvements you make in these areas are excellent preparation for a platform change. For example having an engaged publisher community who are clued-up and care about what they are doing is not only going to help you every day, but will come into its own when you go for content migration in any project,

We need a new platform, nothing else matters

If the old intranet is creaking and clearly needs replacing, a new iteration might be uppermost in your mind, but perhaps not for anybody else. Banking on a new intranet is definitely putting all your eggs in one basket. There are always things to move forward on your existing platform. A new IA, a new design, a bit of well-positioned workflow…but you may need to veer into Minimum Viable Repair territory here. Whatever you do, don’t fall into the trap of assuming a new intranet is all-or-nothing, because it may well end up as nothing.

There is a company merger or reorganisation

Inevitably this is going to hijack your intranet strategy and operations so they are going to more short-term, but it can also influence it for the better by assimilating ideas from the new business, or give an opportunity to introduce things you have been thinking for a while.

The point is a merger can force a rethink of strategy but it doesn’t necessarily mean it is completely divorced from existing strategy, and you can’t move forward with a particular direction. You can also learn to plan for future change, particularly if your company tends to acquire other businesses.

Strategy doesn’t stop

Do any of these scenarios sound familiar?  Perhaps something else in your organisation halted your intranet strategy?  I think the main issue here is that teams need to prioritise strategy. It is what informs your operations and keeps the intranet relevant. Don’t fall into the trap of having an intranet with no direction, because you’re waiting on something else to happen or a decision to be made. 

Steve Bynghall, January 2014

Chris says:

“A strategy is a plan, people. How can you not have a plan? But, as Steve says, we see it all the time. Intranet teams mumble something about the intranet strategy being developed but they just need something to go their way. You know, I wish more of them would look us in the eye with some steel and just say ‘no’. Grab whoever is interested and document your plan for the next 3 to 18 months with what you know now. Imagine it is code and put some if{} else{} statements in. If we get the go-ahead for SharePoint or the new ESN we’ll do this, otherwise this is the plan and we will concentrate some efforts here – let it emerge. But whatever you do, know what you are doing, write it down and share with everyone who cares. And one last thing: if you don’t have the capability to deliver anything of value strategically, revel in being tactical. That’s your strategy right there, so write it down and take it to your bosses. They’ll blush.”

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One thought on “Make sure your intranet strategy is still going when everyone else has stopped

  1. Pingback: Don’t let your project plan and governance, become your intranet strategy and governance (or why Intranet stakeholders are your BFFs) | Intranet directions

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